Welcome to the Harmony Place Addiction Treatment and Addiction Recovery Blog

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Your First Day Home After Rehab

You’ve been waiting for this day for weeks, maybe even months. You’re finally going home after a stay in residential treatment. Congratulations! After going through something this important, you no doubt feel like a changed person. You can’t wait to be reunited with your loved ones, and sleep in your own bed again. You’re probably also a little fearful of what to expect. Rest assured: There are steps you can take in your first day home after rehab that will set the tone for continued recovery.

Your family will likely be very happy to see you. They may remark on how different you look. Sometimes, though, reuniting with family members can be stressful and uncertain. You still have a lot of work to do in rebuilding trust and repairing damaged relationships. With continued sobriety, honesty, open-mindedness, and willingness, you can begin to make progress quickly.

Take some quiet time to go over the packet of materials your treatment center sends home with you. In it, you’ll find instructions for aftercare, including outpatient treatment and finding a therapist, if necessary. You’ll also find a list of 12-step meetings in your area. By the end of your first day home, make arrangements for these critical components of your recovery, and be sure to fill any prescriptions given to you by the treatment center.

Identify a 12-step meeting you can attend the day you get home. The importance of this cannot be overstated. Research has shown that people who go to a 12-step meeting the same day they leave inpatient care greatly lower their risk of relapse.

Once at the meeting, introduce yourself, and let the group know you’re newly out of rehab. You’ll be warmly welcomed, and encouraged to “keep coming back.” You’ll be given a schedule of all the meetings in your community, and a list of group members’ phone numbers. Especially in the beginning, keep these numbers with you at all times. When you’re faced with temptation, call as many numbers as you have to until you reach someone. Make it a practice to call someone else in recovery every day. As you build a sober network, you’ll benefit from the wisdom of others in the program.

In addition to going to outpatient rehab and therapy, you should plan to attend 90 meetings in 90 days. Within your first two weeks back home, choose a home group and a sponsor. With continued care and commitment, you’ll build a solid foundation for continued sobriety. Enjoy your new life!

Recovery is a lifelong journey. It requires professional guidance, and a lot of hard work on your part. At Harmony Place, you never have to do the work alone. We’re there for you, every step of the way. For information on our total continuum of care and luxury residential treatment, and a private consultation, call us today: 1-855-652-9048  

What is Fetal Alcohol Syndrome?

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is defined as “a pattern of physical and mental defects that can develop in a fetus in association with high levels of alcohol consumption during pregnancy.” If you’re a woman who drinks heavily during pregnancy, your unborn child can be harmed during any phase of development. FAS can affect your baby even before you know you’re pregnant.

FAS is falls under the umbrella of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD), which also includes partial Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorder, and alcohol-related birth defects. Symptoms of each of these conditions can appear at any time during childhood. Symptoms vary widely among children. Birth defects caused by maternal drinking are permanent.

Among the most significant consequences of FAS is brain damage that causes impaired coordination, poor emotional control, hyperactivity, mood swings, poor socialization skills, learning disabilities, and lower than average intelligence. Without intervention, these effects can last well into adulthood. Other consequences of FAS include problems affecting the heart, kidneys, and bones, deformities of the limbs, joints, and fingers, slow growth, and vision or hearing impairments.

Newborns with FAS have difficulty in sleeping and suckling. These newborns have a low birth weight, and small head circumference. They have certain characteristic facial features, including small eyes and a small, upturned nose, a thin upper lip, and a smooth skin surface between the nose and the lip.

Children with FAS are at heightened risk of developing a substance use disorder later in life. They’re also more prone to anxiety and depression, as well as eating disorders and inappropriate sexual behavior. Many find it difficult to finish school or live independently. People with FAS have a higher incidence of dying early, either by accident, homicide, or suicide.

All of these consequences of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome are entirely preventable. If you’re a woman of childbearing age who has unprotected sex, you are urged to consider giving up alcohol, since many pregnancies are unplanned. Failing that, you must abstain from alcohol while pregnant, if you’re trying to get pregnant, or if you think you might be pregnant. Alcohol can severely harm both you and your baby. Two lives are at stake.

If you or a woman you love is struggling with alcohol abuse, seek help immediately. To fully recover in mind, body, and spirit takes professional guidance. It also takes a lot of work, but at Harmony Place, you never have to do the work alone. For information on our total continuum of care and luxury residential treatment, as well as a private consultation, call us today: 1-855-652-9048   

Symptoms of Sexual Addiction

Unlike chemical addictions, sexual addiction does not have an official diagnosis in the medical community. However, sexual addiction shares many similarities with substance use disorders; therefore, many of the same treatment modalities are used in both types of addictions, including inpatient therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, group therapy, and 12-step programs.

Sexual addiction manifests in a number of ways, all of them defined by their compulsive nature. Examples of compulsive behavior include masturbation, viewing pornography, phone sex or Internet hookups, cruising for partners, patronizing prostitutes, sadistic or masochistic behavior, fetishism, exhibitionism, or voyeurism. There are a variety of signs of sexual addiction. Following are some of the most common.

Using sex as a drug

Sexual behavior is used to numb feelings of stress, depression, anxiety, and other problems. As with chemical addiction, those with a sexual addiction self-medicate with their compulsive behavior.

Increasing tolerance

Sexual acting out occurs more frequently, and for longer periods. Someone with a sexual addiction may also seek out more partners than intended.

High-risk or illegal behavior

Despite the strong potential for negative consequences, people with a sexual addiction continually need more and more stimulation, and will go to any lengths to achieve it. They risk losing a committed relationship, a job, their reputation, and their health, as well as being arrested.

Trouble meeting obligations

The addiction interferes with day-to-day responsibilities, such as work, school, or family life. Someone with a sexual addiction will continually lie to cover their tracks.

Mental obsession

There’s a constant craving for sexual gratification that distracts the person from all other activities. A great deal of time is spent in planning how to act out sexual fantasies, covering up for one’s behavior, and engaging in the behavior itself.

Attempting to “cut down.”

Those with a sexual addiction may realize they have a problem, and try to control their behavior. When deprived of their desired behavior, they become irritable or angry. Without treatment, their efforts to stop are universally unsuccessful.

Feelings of guilt, shame, and remorse

Someone with a sexual addiction will feel a great sense of moral failure for their behavior. This can lead to depression or suicide attempts.

Are you struggling with a sexual addiction? You are not alone. Treatment is available, and effective. To fully recover in mind, body, and spirit takes professional guidance. It also takes a lot of work, but at Harmony Place, you never have to do the work alone. For information on our total continuum of care and luxury residential treatment, as well as a private consultation, call us today: 1-855-652-9048   

How does Antabuse Work?

Disulfiram, known by the brand name Antabuse, is an alcohol antagonist drug intended to deter problem drinkers from using alcohol. When Antabuse received approval from the federal Food & Drug Administration in 1951, it became the first pharmaceutical medication to treat alcohol use disorders.

Antabuse deters drinking by causing extremely unpleasant reactions to alcohol, including:

  • throbbing headaches
  • vomiting
  • sweating
  • hyperventilation
  • vertigo
  • mental confusion
  • blurred vision
  • dizziness
  • chest pains
  • heart palpitations.

For this reason, Antabuse must never be given when the patient is intoxicated, or without their full knowledge of how the drug will affect them.

Unconsciousness may result at alcohol levels of 125-150 mg. The effects of Antabuse typically last 30-60 minutes, or for as long as alcohol remains in the body. Drinking alcohol up to 14 days after the last dose of Antabuse can produce a reaction. Antabuse can also cause a reaction to certain foods, cosmetics, cough syrups, mouthwash, or topical ointments that contain alcohol.

Antabuse works by preventing liver enzymes from breaking down an alcohol metabolite called acetaldehyde. At high levels, acetaldehyde is toxic; it’s this substance that produces a hangover after a night of heavy drinking. When Antabuse is in the system, the body reacts as if suffering from a massive hangover.

Antabuse is typically prescribed at 500 mg per day for the first week or two, followed by a lower maintenance dose for a period of many months. Antabuse is known to interfere with certain medications, such as diazepam, which is sometimes used to treat the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal, as well as some anti-seizure medications and the blood thinner warfarin. Antabuse is not recommended for people with cardiovascular disease or epilepsy.

Side effects of Antabuse include:

  • drowsiness and fatigue
  • a metallic taste in the mouth
  • vision changes
  • mood changes.

Long-term use of Antabuse can cause liver damage.

It’s important to note that Antabuse does not eliminate cravings for alcohol, and it’s not a cure for alcoholism. Instead, it makes drinking so unpleasant that it acts as a deterrent. Antabuse is most effective when combined with addiction treatment that includes individual counseling and group therapy, attendance at 12-step meetings, and stress-management techniques.

Are you struggling with an addiction to alcohol? It’s not too late to ask for help. To fully recover in mind, body, and spirit takes professional guidance. It also takes a lot of work, but at Harmony Place, you never have to do the work alone. For information on our total continuum of care and luxury residential treatment, as well as a private consultation, call us today: 1-855-652-9048   

Recovery is About Quality, not Quantity

When we’re new to recovery, it’s tempting to think those with more time in the program must have “better” sobriety than we do. To be sure, there’s a tremendous amount of wisdom to be gained from “old-timers” in the program. But there’s also a lot to be gained from newcomers just like us. In recovery, we learn to value the quality of sober time, not just the quantity.

In your journey of recovery, you’ll undoubtedly meet people who draw you in with their positive message, serenity, and sober thinking. It’s those people about whom we say, “I want what they have.” You’ll also meet people whose words and actions don’t jibe. They spread negativity, rather than the program’s hopeful words. About those people, we may think to ourselves, “I don’t want what they have.” In either case, it’s the person’s quality of sobriety that speaks to us. It matters little how much time they have in recovery.

We can apply the idea of quality sobriety to ourselves, as well. Before bed, we ask ourselves, How well did I work my program today? Am I making progress? Was I helpful to someone? If I struggled with my character defects, did I take time to look at my motives? Did I apologize when necessary? We all struggle in recovery, but those of us who are making a genuine effort at sobriety will use difficult days as a learning experience. Many lessons are learned slowly, over time. When our hearts are in the right place, we learn more quickly.

There’s an old joke in recovery circles that the person who woke up earliest today has the most sober time. That’s because we practice sobriety one day at a time. We adhere to the principle that we’re granted a daily reprieve from our addiction, “contingent on the maintenance of our spiritual condition,” according to A.A.’s main text, Alcoholics Anonymous, also known as the “Big Book.” In that sense, each of us only has today.

Recovery is a lifelong journey. To fully recover in mind, body, and spirit requires professional guidance. You have work to do. At Harmony Place, you never have to do the work alone. We believe in your right of self-determination. We’re meeting you where you are, and taking you where you want to go. For information on our total continuum of care and luxury residential treatment, as well as a private consultation, call us today: 1-855-652-9048   

How do we Practice Sobriety in all our Affairs?

At the heart of recovery is sobriety, the act of abstaining from drugs, alcohol, and compulsive behaviors. Recovery is more than sobriety, however: It’s a process of breaking old patterns of behavior, and learning new, healthy ways to cope with life on life’s terms.

As we progress in our recovery, we learn emotional sobriety, something we strive to practice in our everyday lives. In fact, Step 12 of the program of Alcoholics Anonymous states: “Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.” This means we strive to live lives of recovery, service, and love. We seek always to offer hope and help to others, whether they travel in recovery circles or not.

Emotional sobriety demands rigorous honesty, with ourselves, with those in our treatment network, with our Higher Power, and with everyone we encounter on a daily basis. When we find ourselves lapsing into any form of dishonesty, however “small,” we begin to slip from our recovery.

Emotional sobriety also requires us to be open-minded. In life, as in recovery, we will inevitably encounter people we don’t particularly like. We may not like their behavior, or what they have to say. Human beings are inherently flawed, but also inherently good. When we recognize that all of us are equal, that none of is more valuable or worthy than anyone else, we begin to treat other people with compassion. We strive to “seek first to understand, and then to be understood.”

Finally, practicing sobriety in all our affairs means that we become willing: Willing to listen, to share, to change, to accept, to give, to love, and to be loved in return. We keep at the front of our minds that not everyone has a program of recovery; therefore, we lead by the power of example.

Recovery is a lifelong journey of self-discovery. Recovery doesn’t just happen. To fully recover in mind, body, and spirit requires professional guidance. You have work to do. At Harmony Place, you never have to do the work alone. We believe in your right of self-determination. We’re meeting you where you are and taking you where you want to go. For information on our total continuum of care and luxury residential treatment, as well as a private consultation, call us today: 1-855-652-9048   

8 Ways to Stay Sober During the Holidays

The decorations, the hot chocolate, the caroling, the gifts- it’s December. Just when you thought it was safe to celebrate the season, along it comes: The holiday party. That used to mean too much food, and too much booze. Now that you’re in recovery, it’s time to find new ways to stay sober during the holidays. Following are eight tried-and-true tips.

Consider whether it’s safe to accept an invitation

Just because you’re invited doesn’t necessarily mean you have to show up. Nothing is more important than your recovery, and early sobriety is an especially fragile time.

 Have your own transportation

If you do decide to attend a social gathering where others will be partying or overeating, take your own car, or arrange your own way home with a sober person. Don’t offer to be the designated driver; you need to be able to leave when you are ready.

Bring your own

Bring along a gift of food or drink that’s safe for you to have. When eating foods on the holiday table, you must be certain they’re not prepared with alcohol. If you’re not sure, ask.

 Hang out with the sober people

You almost certainly won’t be the only one at the party who’s not drinking, drugging, or overeating; if you are, ask yourself what you’re doing there.

 Acknowledge the temptation

Be mindful if you start to feel cravings. Then, retreat to another room or go outside, and immediately call your sponsor, a sober friend or a trusted family member with whom you can be completely honest about your fears and feelings.

 Ask your higher power to remove the temptation to relapse

Say the Serenity Prayer, over and over if you have to. Think back to the bottom you hit before entering treatment, and play the tape all the way to the end. Remind yourself that if you pick up a drink or a drug, it will not end well.

 Don’t keep gifts of alcohol or sugary foods

If you’re forced to accept such items, re-gift them as soon as possible. If you have to, throw it in the trash. By all means, do not keep it.

 Plan your alone time well

Spending too much time by yourself can also tempt you to relapse. Make sure you have a plan for your time alone, so you don’t give in to depression and anxiety. As with everything else in life, balance is key. Do what makes you feel comfortable and safe. The only mandate is that you stay sober.

Recovery is a lifelong journey. To fully recover in mind, body, and spirit requires professional guidance. You have work to do. At Harmony Place, you never have to do the work alone. For information on our total continuum of care and luxury residential treatment, as well as a private consultation, call us today: 1-855-652-9048  

Does Relapse Equal Failure?

Addiction, by definition, is “a chronic, relapsing brain disease that characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use, despite harmful consequences.” Until we seek treatment for our addictions, relapse is inevitable. With treatment, we learn to identify the root causes of our addiction, as well as effective ways to prevent relapse.

When you enter treatment, it’s important to remember that relapse doesn’t have to be a part of your story. If you do relapse, however, know that it’s not a sign of failure. Relapse is common, and a great many people who suffer a relapse return to recovery with renewed commitment. Relapse can happen at any point, including early in sobriety, or after many years.

A large part of preventing relapse means being wary of people, places, and things. We must avoid places, such as liquor stores, bars, or street corners where we used to buy drugs, and rid our possessions of things that act as triggers, such as drug paraphernalia or bar ware. Avoiding people with whom we used to drink or do drugs can be trickier, especially when they are family members; if we can’t avoid certain people altogether, it’s essential that we set healthy boundaries for ourselves.

It’s important to bear in mind that relapse is a process. Many factors precede a relapse, including: Falling into depression or anxiety, self-pity, dishonesty, becoming over-confident about our recovery, and believing we can one day use again. Those who work in the field of addiction recovery often say a relapse begins with our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Picking up a drink or a drug actually marks the end of a relapse.

As a rule, relapse is a sure sign you must adjust your treatment. Depending upon the nature of your addiction and how long your return to active addiction lasts, you may need to enter a residential or outpatient treatment program, even if you previously completed such a program. You may also require medication. At the very least, you will need to increase your attendance at 12-step meetings, individual therapy, and/or group therapy sessions.

Recovery is a complicated process. It means not just abstaining from drugs, alcohol, and compulsive behaviors, but changing old patterns of behavior and learning new, healthy behaviors. Recovery means building a new way of living.

Addiction is a progressive, incurable, and fatal disease if left untreated. Recovery requires professional guidance. You have work to do. At Harmony Place, you never have to do the work alone. We’re meeting where you are and taking you where you want to go. For information on our total continuum of care and luxury residential treatment, as well as a private consultation, call us today: 1-855-652-9048   

10 Reasons Recovery is Awesome

It can be argued there’s absolutely nothing good about having an addiction. On the other hand, there are lots of good things about getting sober. Following are 10 reasons recovery is awesome.

You’ll have fun

Using drugs or alcohol, or practicing an addictive behavior might have seemed like fun at first, but it was only a matter of time before that “fun” turned into outright misery. In recovery, you’ll experience genuine fun trying all the things you were too drunk or high to do before.

You’ll have real friend

Admit it: In your using days, most of your friends only wanted to see you if you had money, drugs, or booze. Now, you’ll make genuine friends who care how you are, not what you can do for them.

You’ll remember conversations

Since intoxication is pretty much a memory-buster, most of what you do remember probably only makes you cringe, anyway. You’ll now be able to remember people’s names and the details they share with you. Win!

You’ll hold down a job

Being employable again means earning your own living, instead of sponging off other people. You’ll have money in your pocket, and you won’t blow it all the same day you get it.

You’ll feel good physically

Now that you’re no longer “sick and suffering,” you’ll start to experience a newfound energy and stamina – the kind that’s not followed by a horrendous crash.

You’ll start to look better

Self-care is a wonderful thing. It means showering every day, and paying attention to your appearance. When you look in the mirror, you’ll see a human being.

You’ll get your wits back

As the fog begins to lift from your mind, you’ll find yourself thinking more clearly. Your cognitive functions will improve, and you’ll realize you’re a lot smarter than you thought.

You’ll regain the trust of others

You probably weren’t the most trustworthy character in active addiction. That will begin to change as you start keeping your promises, showing up for life, and doing the next right thing.

Your attitude will get better

You’ll start to realize that everything doesn’t suck, and the world is not out to get you. You’ll start to see the good in situations and people.

 You’ll know serenity

As you grow and develop a relationship with your higher power, you will know “a new freedom and a new happiness.” For the first time in a long time, you’ll have hope.

Recovery takes a lot of work, but at Harmony Place, you never have to do the work alone. We’re right here with you, every step of the way. We’re meeting where you are and taking you where you want to go. For information on our total continuum of care and luxury residential treatment, as well as a private consultation, call us today: 1-855-652-9048   

Why is Humility Important in Recovery?

In understanding why humility is important in recovery, let’s first take a look at the word’s meaning. Humility is defined as, “Freedom from pride or arrogance.” Note the word freedom; pride and arrogance are a prison that isolates us from each other and from God.

Humility is also defined as, “The state of being humble.” The words humility and humble both have their root in the Latin word humilis, which means low; the Latin word humus, meaning earth, is also similar in origin. Thus, when we are humble, we are not proud or haughty, but instead low, or close to the earth. Being humble is a way of being grounded.

Humility is generally a state we choose for ourselves, as opposed to humiliation, which means, “feeling ashamed or foolish.” Humiliation, which also comes from the Latin root humilis, is different from humility because it carries the weight of shame. Humiliation is a state none of us would willingly choose.

Since every person with an addiction is essentially “an egomaniac with low self-esteem,” we typically feel we’re the best of the best – the greatest gift humanity has ever known – as well as the worst of the worst – the lousiest human being in the world – at various times. Both of these sentiments are signs of an outsized ego.

The first job of recovery is ego-deflation. When we truly begin to understand humility, we understand we’re no better and no worse than any other person; we are simply one of many. Each of us has gifts worthy of nurturing, and each of us is a flawed human being. When we understand this, we feel compassion for all our fellow travelers on planet Earth.

Only then do we begin to grow spiritually. Remember that addiction is a physical, mental, and spiritual malady. In nurturing humility, we nurture our spirit. We become able to receive God’s grace. Ironically, it’s from the “low” state of humility that we learn to walk with dignity. Thus, humility is not a form of weakness, but a sign of great strength.

Recovery is a lifelong journey. To fully recover in mind, body, and spirit requires professional guidance. You have work to do. At Harmony Place, you never have to do the work alone. We believe in your right of self-determination. We’re meeting you where you are, and taking you where you want to go. For information on our total continuum of care and luxury residential treatment, as well as a private consultation, call us today: 1-855-652-9048  

The Link Between Celebrity Status and Addiction

Celebrity addiction has always been a staple of tabloid fodder. Every week, it seems we read or hear about a new celeb who’s checked into rehab, or come clean to the world about their battle with drugs, alcohol, or a compulsive behavioral disorder. It may therefore come as a surprise to learn that the rich and famous have the same rates of addiction as everyone else.

According to Dr. Drew Pinsky, former host of the VH1 series “Celebrity Rehab with Dr. Drew,” stars don’t get a pass on addiction, but neither are they at a higher risk. “Every weeknight for decades we’ve had celebrities on Loveline and given them surveys about their family, fame, upbringing, drug use,” Pinsky said in a 2010 interview. “And the addiction rates are exactly what you’d see in society at large.”

Celebrities are burdened with the same hereditary and emotional risk factors as everyday people who suffer from addiction. However, stars also have the added pressure of expectation, from the industry, the media, and the public. They look to self-medicate for their stress and anxiety, just as many of us do. Stars are typically surrounded by enablers, who both protect and feed the addiction. In addition to providing them with an endless stream of drugs and alcohol, celebrities’ wealth and status may sometimes insulate them from certain consequences of addiction – at least for a while.

When their addiction is revealed, however, stars face the same humiliation and criticism as the rest of us who are addicted do – even more so, some might argue. While celebrities may have better access to treatment, that doesn’t mean they’re any more willing to seek it. There’s a tendency for the public to think that someone with all the trappings of money and fame should be able to control their behavior. However, addiction robs all its victims of the power of choice, rich and poor alike.

For too many celebrities, the disease of addiction cost them their very lives. Elvis Presley, Marilyn Monroe, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Kurt Cobain, Amy Winehouse, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Whitney Houston, Prince, Michael Jackson, and countless others have suffered fatal drug overdoses. Others are lucky enough to recover, and go on to share their struggles with the public.

One thing is clear: While stardom doesn’t cause addiction, it doesn’t make the fight any easier.

When you are choosing a private residential treatment program, you deserve a program that focuses on personalized care, while offering the greatest luxury accommodations. Harmony Place has the highest accreditation’s, providing a full continuum of treatment options, from detox to transitional living. For a private consultation and more information, call us today: 1-855-652-9048. Don’t wait any longer.

Why is Honesty Important in Recovery?

One of the hallmarks of active addiction is dishonesty. In order to protect our addiction, we raised lying, cheating, and stealing to an art form. We became so smooth at being dishonest that we could no longer tell the difference between fact and fiction.

Getting honest is the first step we take toward sobriety. Until we finally admit we have a problem, we cannot be freed of our enslavement to drugs, alcohol, and compulsive behaviors. Thus, honesty is the very cornerstone of our recovery, laying the foundation even before we understand what the solution is.

Early on in our recovery, we’re told we must be honest, open-minded, and willing. It’s no accident that honesty comes first. We quickly come to learn that recovery demands “rigorous honesty,” as our 12-step literature tells us – not just with ourselves, not just with our Higher Power, but with everyone we encounter.

When we get honest with our family members, loved ones, and co-workers, we begin to rebuild trust, and repair damaged relationships. Being honest does not mean blaming other people; it means owning our own thoughts and feelings. We stop telling “little white lies,” which, we once reasoned, wouldn’t hurt anyone. For example, if we’re late for work because we overslept, we don’t blame it on a flat tire; we tell the truth. Neither do we “lie by omission,” in which deceive others by withholding information.

We might believe it’s acceptable to be dishonest as a way to spare someone’s feelings. However, true kindness is based on honesty. False flattery is a form of manipulation, not kindness. We also resist the powerful urge to embellish the truth to make ourselves look better. It’s okay to be human, to be who we are. Our humanity connects us to other people, and builds the bridge of relationships.

Finally, we apply the principle of honesty on a daily basis in dealing with the public. That means if a store clerk hands us too much change, we return it. We don’t take what doesn’t belong to us, even when no one is likely to find out.

Perhaps the ultimate test of being honest means holding ourselves accountable to the standards our Higher Power has set for us. We no longer seek to play every situation to our own advantage, or even to just get by in life. Instead, we strive to live up to our fullest potential, and become the person we were meant to be.

Recovery is a lifelong journey of self-discovery. To fully recover in mind, body, and spirit requires professional guidance. You have work to do. At Harmony Place, you never have to do the work alone. For information on our total continuum of care and luxury residential treatment and a private consultation, call us today: 1-855-652-9048