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Behavioral Changes That Indicate Drug Abuse

Behavioral Changes That Indicate Drug AbuseIf you’re worried someone you love is abusing drugs, or if you’re worried about your own drug use, a number of signs may arouse your suspicion. Drug abuse often results in behavioral changes that point to a problem. Some of the behavioral changes listed below can be a cue to problems other than drug abuse, but, taken together with a number of physical signs, they are a sure indication of the need for help.

  1. A dramatic shift in attitude or personality. If you or your loved one has suddenly become moody, angry, resentful, anxious, or depressed – and there is no other identifiable reason – drug abuse may be to blame. Similarly, a sudden shift toward giddiness in someone who isn’t normally so may be an indication of drug abuse.
  2. A sudden change in friends. This is especially true for adolescents. If your teen has suddenly started hanging out with a different crowd – but these new friends are not part of their extracurricular sports teams, clubs, or other activities – they may be spending time with drug users.
  3. A sudden drop in grades. Schoolwork often suffers as a result of drug abuse, as does performance at work. If this drop in grades or work performance is across the board, rather than in isolated areas, it suggests a general lack of caring or motivation.
  4. Lying and secrecy. Habitual dishonesty about where your loved one has been or with whom, a sudden refusal to return calls or texts, along with many other deceits, is a sure sign they’re hiding something. A sudden, inexplicable insistence on “privacy” is another sign. Your loved one likely will become defensive when pressed about these behavioral changes.
  5. A lack of self-care. If you or someone you love has become chronically lax in personal grooming habits or general appearance, drug abuse may be the reason. Almost never is drug abuse responsible for greater self-care.
  6. Being “spaced out.” Many drugs cause us to become uncharacteristically forgetful, inattentive, or unable to concentrate. A sudden lack of focus may indicate a problem.
  7. Stealing. If you find cash, valuables, alcohol, or prescription drugs missing from your home, it could be due to a love one’s need to support a drug habit. They may also begin to shoplift, or burglarize other homes or businesses.

If you find drugs, or paraphernalia such as pipes, bongs, rolling papers, syringes, coke spoons or straws, it’s an irrefutable sign of drug use. Consult a counselor and look into treatment as soon as possible.

Recovery doesn’t just happen. To fully recover in mind, body, and spirit requires professional guidance. You have work to do. At Harmony Place, you never have to do the work alone. We believe in your right of self-determination. We’re meeting where you are and taking you where you want to go. For information on our total continuum of care and luxury residential treatment and a private consultation, call us today: 1-855-652-9048

What Happens at a 12-Step Meeting?

What Happens at a 12-Step Meeting?Twelve-step programs form the basis for continuing sobriety once we complete our treatment program. Joining a 12-step group provides a fellowship of recovery and a network of sober friends, which are vital to remaining free of drugs, alcohol, and compulsive behaviors.

While the exact format of a 12-step meeting varies from program to program and group to group, all are based on the 12 steps of Alcoholics Anonymous. Founded in 1935, A.A. is the oldest of the 12-step fellowships. Other programs aimed at helping addicts include Narcotics Anonymous, Sex Addicts Anonymous, Gamblers Anonymous, Overeaters Anonymous, Debtors Anonymous, and many others. In addition, a number of programs support the addict’s friends and family, including Al-Anon, Alateen, Adult Children of Alcoholics, Co-Dependents Anonymous, Gam-Anon, and Gam-a-Teen.

Taking A.A. as our example, the protocol for meetings is dictated by each individual group, which establishes a “group conscience” for running the program. A majority of groups open with the A.A. Preamble, along with a portion of Alcoholics Anonymous (known as the “Big Book”) called “How It Works.” Many groups recite the “Serenity Prayer,” while others close with the “Lord’s Prayer.” It’s also common for groups to observe a moment of silence, “for the still sick and suffering alcoholic, in and out of the rooms.” While accepted as long-standing A.A. customs, none of these practices is required.

Meetings typically last one hour, and are considered “closed” unless otherwise stated; this means attendance is limited to those who have a desire to stop drinking. Anonymity is the foundation of any 12-step program. Therefore, we do not divulge whom we’ve seen or what we’ve heard at a meeting.

There are several types of A.A. meetings. Following are three of the most common:

  • Beginners: While any alcoholic may attend, Beginners meetings are structured with the newcomer in mind. These meetings are an exception to the suggestion that newcomers refrain from sharing in their first 90 days of sobriety. Here, everyone is welcome to share.
  • Step: The group will focus on each of the 12 steps, one at a time and in order, over a period of weeks or months, before beginning the cycle again. Groups typically read from the book Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions; then, an alcoholic will “qualify” about their experience in working that particular step. The floor is then opened for sharing.
  • Open Speaker: These meeting are open to the public, with only the speaker(s) sharing their “experience, strength, and hope.” As we listen to the stories of other alcoholics, we are reminded to identify, not compare. While the speaker’s details may differ from our own, the feelings are universal among alcoholics.

Recovery doesn’t just happen. To fully recover in mind, body, and spirit requires professional guidance. You have work to do. At Harmony Place, you never have to do the work alone. For information on our total continuum of care and luxury residential treatment and a private consultation, call us today: 1-855-652-9048

Becoming Present is Hard

Becoming Present is HardIn recovery, one of the hardest skills we must learn is how to be present in the moment. As active addicts, we numbed ourselves at every opportunity. Wherever we were at any given moment, we longed to be somewhere else. We were essentially master escape artists. Therefore, it comes as no surprise that learning to be mindful takes a great deal of practice.

We’re accustomed to ignoring what our bodies are telling us. It can be surprisingly hard to identify that we’re feeling hungry, tired, or in pain. So often, we don’t realize our shoulders are hunched in stress, and we’re seldom aware of the look on our face until someone else points it out. These physical cues are important indications of our feelings. We don’t pay attention to those feelings until they overwhelm use. We feel anxious, depressed, impatient, or resentful, but we can’t identify these feelings as such.

It helps to a look at ourselves in a mirror. By simply acknowledging the tension in our face, we begin to relax. We take several deep, slow breaths, exhaling as deeply as we inhale. After a few moments, we find we’ve “reset” ourselves back to a neutral state. By making a deliberate effort to be present, we become aware of ourselves in the moment. Just as importantly, we become aware of our environment, and we reconnect with the people in our world. We ask ourselves, “What was he saying to me just now?” We bring our focus back to the present.

By learning to be aware of our thoughts, feelings, physical state, and surroundings, we also become aware of the triggers that tempt us to relapse. Initially, we don’t know why we suddenly want to drink again. With practice, we begin to see the connection between our feelings and our addictive triggers. By being present in the moment, this awareness is possible.

Mindfulness takes some time. Be patient with yourself and recognize that being present takes repeated, deliberate effort. Over time, though, being present becomes much easier. The rewards of mindfulness are powerful. When we learn to pay attention to what’s going on in the moment, we can prevent small problems from becoming unmanageable. We also learn to savor life’s little pleasures – something we could never do before. Being present teaches us that life is sweet.

Recovery doesn’t just happen. To fully recover in mind, body, and spirit requires professional guidance. You have work to do. At Harmony Place, you never have to do the work alone. We believe in your right of self-determination. We’re meeting where you are and taking you where you want to go. For information on our total continuum of care and luxury residential treatment and a private consultation, call us today: 1-855-652-9048

Why do People Substitute One Addiction for Another?

Why do People Substitute One Addiction for Another?It’s a phenomenon we see often enough: Breaking one addiction, only to pick up another one. Maybe we stopping doing opioids, but rationalize that we can drink beer. Perhaps we quit drinking, but tell ourselves it’s okay to smoke some pot. Food, too, can seem like a “safe” indulgence. The problem is, these substitutions can soon spiral into full-blown addictions of their own, if we don’t address the root causes of our addictive behavior.

In recovery, we come to understand that drugs, alcohol, and compulsive behaviors are but a symptom of the disease of addiction. It doesn’t really matter which substance or behavior we’re addicted to; our mental obsession tells us that having more is our highest priority. Additionally, substituting one substance or behavior for another can put us a risk of relapsing into our original addiction.

We’re often told we must replace our negative addictions with positive activities, such as exercising or working. While these activities may indeed be “healthier” or “safer” than our primary addiction, we run the risk of becoming obsessed all over again if we don’t strive for balance in every aspect of our lives. Without addressing the three-pronged physical, mental, and spiritual malady that is both a cause and a consequence of our addiction, we are doomed to remain enslaved to something.

When we’re poly-addicted, we might think it best to work on each addiction separately, one at a time. However, this approach nearly always leads us to relapse. Therefore, if we’re to really recover, we must make a daily decision to abstain from all addictive substances and behaviors.

We seek recovery by entering a treatment center, attending a 12-step group, and working with a sponsor, therapist, or spiritual advisor. Recovery takes patience and a great deal of practice. It requires a daily commitment. Remember that we’re addressing thoughts and behaviors that are deeply ingrained, and change does not come easy. Above all, remember that the disease of addiction is progressive, incurable, and fatal if left untreated. However, with treatment, we can and do recover.

Recovery is a lifelong journey. To fully recover in mind, body, and spirit requires professional guidance. You have work to do. At Harmony Place, you never have to do the work alone. For information on our total continuum of care and luxury residential treatment and a private consultation, call us today: 1-855-652-9048

10 Ways You’ll Have More Fun Than You Realize in Treatment

10 Ways You’ll Have More Fun Than You Realize in TreatmentRecovering from addiction takes a lot of hard work, commitment, and dedication on your part. Knowing you’re not alone on your journey can make your stay in treatment a lot more manageable. It also means there’s a lot of potential for bonding, and for fun. Following are 10 ways you’ll have a lot more fun than you realize in treatment.

  1. You will laugh. Often. You’ll laugh at yourself, and at your situation. One great piece of advice to remember is, “Take your recovery seriously, but not yourself.” Find joy in life’s absurdities. Whatever you do, laugh with others. It’s contagious!
  2. You’ll meet new people. All kinds of people. If you keep a positive attitude and share it with others, you’re bound to make lots of new friends.
  3. You will love and be loved. Few bonds are stronger than those between people who suffer together. As you go through withdrawals and early treatment with other addicts, you’ll form deep friendships; some will last a lifetime.
  4. You will celebrate. Birthdays, holidays, and anniversaries take on new meaning when you’re sober. No, you won’t be cracking open a bottle of champagne to celebrate, but there are lots of other ways to rejoice in life’s milestones, big and small.
  5. You will experience a new environment. Your treatment center may or may not offer luxury accommodations, but either way, it offers a break from the confines of your daily life. Have fun as you explore your new surroundings, and be sure to keep a journal of your experiences there.
  6. You’ll try new activities. Never really thought of yourself as an artist? You might tap a hidden talent as you participate in an art therapy class.
  7. You’ll get some exercise. Regaining physical wellness is a huge part of recovery. Many treatment centers have swimming pools, volleyball courts, sports fields, exercise equipment, and so on; some offer equine therapy. Make it a habit to take a daily walk around the grounds, too.
  8. You’ll have sober parties. Drugs and alcohol are not a requirement for having fun, dancing, and listening to great tunes. Spice up the party with a selection of “mocktails.”
  9. You’ll have roommates. Unless you have a significant other at home, you probably haven’t shared a room with anyone since childhood. Build a blanket fort together and talk past lights-out.
  10.  You’ll eat different foods. The cafeteria fare at your treatment center may very well be different from the food you eat at home. Enjoy the change in menu, and take pleasure in eating healthy foods.

Recovery doesn’t just happen. To fully recover in mind, body, and spirit requires professional guidance. You have work to do. At Harmony Place, you never have to do the work alone. We believe in your right of self-determination. We’re meeting where you are and taking you where you want to go. For information on our total continuum of care and luxury residential treatment and a private consultation, call us today: 1-855-652-9048

 

What is Salvia?

What is Salvia?Salvia divinorum – commonly known as salvia, diviner’s sage, Sally D, and magic mint ­– is an herb in the mint family native to Central and South America, as well as southern Mexico. Salvia belongs to a class of drugs known as dissociative hallucinogens, which cause users to feel detached from themselves and their environment, while experiencing distorted perceptions, thoughts, and emotions. Unlike other hallucinogens, salvia’s effects are short-lived, typically lasting less than 30 minutes.

Salvia, which is smoked, chewed, or brewed as a tea, is legal in most states. The national Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has labeled it a drug of concern, though salvia remains unscheduled as a controlled substance. According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, salvia was the most commonly used hallucinogen – far ahead of LSD and PCP – by high school seniors in 2013, at nearly 6 percent. By the following year, the rate of salvia use had dropped markedly to just 1.8 percent, while use of LSD and PCP remained relatively constant, at 2.7 percent and 1.3 percent, respectively.

As with other hallucinogens, salvia alters the communication between neurotransmitters in the brain and spinal cord. Salvia activates the nerve cells’ kappa opioid receptors, which differ from other receptors activated by opioids such as heroin and morphine. The result is a disruption in cognition, emotions, and perception of pain. Feelings of invulnerability are common, along with sensory hallucinations.

Dissociative hallucinogens such as salvia may also cause fear, anxiety, panic, paranoia, aggression, memory loss, and tremors. Salvia is known to cause wildly fluctuating mood swings, as well as psychosis. Dangerous changes in blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature, and respiration may occur with high doses; when combined with alcohol or other depressants, salvia may cause respiratory distress, coma, or death.

Scientists have not extensively studied the effects of salvia, so much about the drug remains unknown. Though salvia has been used for centuries in religious ceremonies in Central and South America, the drug arrived in North America and Europe only a few decades ago. At present, researchers do not believe salvia is physically addictive, but users may develop a psychological dependence on the drug.

Salvia and other hallucinogens can be extremely dangerous. If you or someone you love is abusing salvia, or any other drug, seek help immediately. Treatment is just a phone call away, and you are not alone.

Recovery is a lifelong journey. To fully recover in mind, body, and spirit requires professional guidance. You have work to do. At Harmony Place, you never have to do the work alone. For information on our total continuum of care and luxury residential treatment and a private consultation, call us today: 1-855-652-9048

Will I Die from Cocaine Addiction?

Will I Die from Cocaine Addiction?Cocaine is a wily enemy. Though not physically addicting, cocaine’s power to emotionally enslave its users makes it one of the hardest addictions to break.

Cocaine is manufactured from the coca plant, grown mainly in Central and South America. In 2014, 1.5 million United States residents used cocaine, and about 913,000 were dependent on the drug, according to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH). Cocaine abuse and addiction in America has been fairly stable since 2009, declining sharply from its peak in the late 1990s. The use of cocaine by U.S. teenagers has been declining since 2009. Despite this leveling off, cocaine remains second only to marijuana as the nation’s most prevalent recreational drug.

The number of cocaine overdose deaths in the U.S. peaked in 2006, at about 7,500 people. Cocaine overdose deaths then declined each year until 2011, but that number has been steadily increasing since 2013.

In comparison, some 2 million Americans abused prescription opioids in 2015, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse; that year, nearly 600,000 people were addicted to heroin, and at least 33,000 people died of an opioid overdose.

Because cocaine is often “cut” with heroin, and vice versa, medical examiners across the country have seen a curious phenomenon: Opioid overdose deaths have shown a co-occurring increase in cocaine overdose, despite the fact that cocaine usage has not increased since 2009.

Death from cocaine overdose is frequently the result of cardiac arrest. Cocaine is a powerful stimulant that causes the heart to speed up, until it simply gives out. Cocaine-induced heart attack can happen after just one use of the drug, or after many years. Studies have shown no correlation between length of cocaine use and a resulting heart attack. Cocaine also causes high blood pressure, strokes, and seizures, all of which can be fatal as well.

Cocaine is an extremely dangerous drug, and addiction is devastating. If you or someone you love cannot stop using cocaine, seek help from a treatment center. Recovering from cocaine abuse or addiction requires specialized care, but you don’t have to suffer alone any longer. Help is just a phone call away.

 

When you are choosing a private residential treatment program, choose the program that focuses on personalized care, the greatest luxury accommodations, and has the highest accreditations. Harmony Place offers a full continuum of treatment options from detox to transitional living encouraging recovery for a lifetime. For a private consultation and more information, call us today: 1-855-652-9048

You Can Make Everything in Life an Adventure

You Can Make Everything in Life an AdventureIn recovery, you’re learning that all things are indeed possible. With each new day comes a renewed sense of excitement at life’s endless opportunities. You’re coming to see that life is not a sentence to be endured; life is an adventure, and it’s yours to enjoy!

In active addiction, you likely let go of many of the hobbies and activities that once brought you pleasure. Now is the time to pick up those hobbies again with renewed vigor, and remind yourself why they once made you so happy. It’s also a great time to discover new activities that interest and challenge you, both physically and mentally. Why not take up a new sport or activity that’s always sounded fun to you? Spelunking, anyone? You’re never too old to get physically active. Even taking regular walks around your neighborhood can be an adventure if you make it your goal to spot three new things every time. Plus, you’ll meet great people, and great dogs.

Keep your mind sharp by studying a new language, or teach yourself how to finally crack that daily Sudoku or crossword puzzle. Remember, too, that reading is an adventure. Always wanted to see Italy, but lack the funds to go right now? Pick up a book on the country’s sights, culture, and history, take up learning conversational Italian, and begin squirreling away a little money every day, starting today. By the time you save up enough to get there, you’ll be fluent in the language.

Celebrate your successes and milestones with friends and family members who support your recovery, as well as your new circle of sober friends. Celebrate birthdays, anniversaries, and holidays by laughing with the ones you love. Heck, celebrate Arbor Day by hugging a tree, just because.

If you’re stable in your job, why not consider working for that promotion you’ve always wanted? If you’re in the market for a new job, why not look into a new line of work? Taking some classes in your current or desired field could be just what you need to boost your job satisfaction, and possibly, your earning potential.

As you begin to thrive in recovery, you realize you’re participating in life! Watch in amazement as a whole new world unfolds before you … enjoy every minute!

 

Recovery doesn’t just happen. To fully recover in mind, body, and spirit requires professional guidance. You have work to do. At Harmony Place, you never have to do the work alone. We believe in your right of self-determination. We’re meeting where you are and taking you where you want to go. For information on our total continuum of care and luxury residential treatment and a private consultation, call us today: 1-855-652-9048

Why is Adderall Abuse Normalized in College Settings?

Why is Adderall Abuse Normalized in College Settings?Adderall, a stimulant consisting of amphetamine and dextroamphetamine, is commonly prescribed to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Adderall is widely diverted and abused, particularly by young adults attending college.

A survey by the national Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) found that in 2015, some 425,000 adolescents ages 12-17 abused or misused prescription stimulants, including Adderall. However, the number of young adults ages 18-25 who abused or misused amphetamines was about fivefold, or nearly 2.5 million, the same year.

The pressure to succeed in college is often cited as a reason for taking Adderall without a prescription. Ironically, while Adderall’s allure as an aid to the rigorous demands of studying, working, and other activities appeals to some students, abuse or misuse of the drug often leads to lower grades, according to several reports.

Other college students misuse Adderall as a recreational drug, strictly for its stimulant effect. The 2015 SAMHSA study found that about 7 percent of college students reported recreational use of Adderall, the highest rate in recent years.

Misuse or abuse of Adderall is defined as taking it without a legal prescription, taking more of the drug or taking it more frequently than prescribed, or taking it in a way not prescribed, such as crushing the pills and snorting the drug. Since Adderall is widely available on college campuses, there’s a tendency to think, “everybody does it, so what’s the harm?” In fact, the potential harms are many.

Effects of Adderall abuse include:

  • Dizziness
  • Weakness of the limbs
  • Hypertension
  • Racing heartbeat
  • Fever
  • Difficulty breathing, or chest pain
  • Rash, hives, blisters, or peeling skin
  • Vision problems
  • Paranoia
  • Aggression
  • Mania
  • Seizures.

Adderall overdose may result in:

  • Hallucinations, or delirium
  • Panic attacks
  • Cardiac arrhythmia
  • Hyperventilation
  • Tremors
  • Loss of consciousness, or coma.

Adderall addiction is marked by an increasing tolerance to and dependence on the drug to feel “normal.” Withdrawal symptoms include fatigue, sleep disturbances, and depression.

If you or someone you care about is abusing Adderall, seek help without delay. Addiction is a progressive, incurable, and fatal disease if left untreated. However, help is available, and you don’t have to suffer any longer. Remember: You are not alone.

When you are choosing a private residential treatment program, choose the program that focuses on personalized care, the greatest luxury accommodations, and has the highest accreditations. Harmony Place offers a full continuum of treatment options from detox to transitional living encouraging recovery for a lifetime. For a private consultation and more information, call us today: 1-855-652-9048

Working on Your Cognitive Functions is Important

Working on Your Cognitive Functions is ImportantCognitive functions, otherwise known as our mental faculties, are activities of the brain that help us learn and understand information. Cognitive functions include reasoning, language, memory, attention, problem-solving and decision-making skills, comprehension, and judgment. A number of things affect our cognitive functions, including our genetic makeup, our health, emotions, and the environment.

Drugs and alcohol impair our cognitive functions, especially when used over long periods, and in some cases, lead to permanent cognitive damage over time. When we recover from substance abuse, however, our cognitive functions can and do improve. Following are tips to help you work on your cognitive functions.

  1. Get regular exercise. Studies show that exercise increases blood flow to the brain, and can improve our memory, decision-making skills, and comprehension. Exercise has the added benefit of reducing stress, a well-known inhibitor of learning, memory, and judgment.
  2. Get plenty of sleep. The positive effects of adequate sleep on learning and memory are well documented. Conversely, studies show that not getting enough sleep leaves us unable to concentrate and solve problems – plus, it makes us grumpy.
  3.     Eat a healthy diet. Once again, science has the answer: Eating foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids greatly improves neural plasticity – the connections between neurons in the brain that are “plastic,” or adaptable. Eating lots of junk food, on the other hand, increases the risk of neurological dysfunction.
  4.     Get treatment for your depression. People who are depressed are far more likely to suffer cognitive impairment, particularly as they get older. Memory, reasoning, and decision-making skills are most affected.
  5.     Go back to school. Education is the brain’s best defense against cognitive decline. Active learning can improve virtually every cognitive function. If school’s not in the cards for you, learn by visiting museums, attending workshops, and reading daily. Pick up a new hobby, too.
  6. Tease your brain. Puzzles and word games can significantly sharpen your cognition, reasoning, language, and problem-solving skills. In addition to traditional crossword puzzles, anagrams and cryptograms, number-based Sudoku puzzles are also great brain-teasers.
  7.     Be an active listener and viewer. When you watch TV, read, or listen to music, opt for “smart” choices over pop-culture material. Ask questions about what you’ve just taken in. Your brain will be much more engaged, resulting in improved cognitive functioning overall.

Recovery doesn’t just happen. To fully recover in mind, body, and spirit requires professional guidance. You have work to do. At Harmony Place, you never have to do the work alone. We believe in your right of self-determination. We’re meeting where you are and taking you where you want to go. For information on our total continuum of care and luxury residential treatment and a private consultation, call us today: 1-855-652-9048

Why are Some Treatments Evidence-Based While Others are Not?

Why are Some Treatments Evidence-Based While Others are Not?Evidence-based treatment, called EBT for short, refers to forms of treatment and therapy that are backed by scientific evidence. The designation has its roots in evidence-based medicine, established in 1992, and other disciplines in which extensive study and research form the backbone of treatment. All such practices and programs in the United States are listed in the National Registry for Evidence-Based Practices and Programs, maintained by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. The criteria required for designation as an EBT are specific and rigorous.

All evidence-based practices and treatments are guided by three core principles:

  1. The best available research evidence determines whether a given treatment works, and why.
  2. Clinical experience and judgment determines each patient’s state of health and diagnosis, as well as the individual risk and benefit of potential treatments.
  3. The preferences and values of individual patients.

The American Psychological Association promotes the importance of evidence-based therapies, supporting treatments proven to be successful in large numbers of people. Many U.S. health insurers will only cover the cost of evidence-based therapies and treatments, including medications.

Examples of evidence-based treatments for addiction and mental health disorders include cognitive behavioral therapy, EMDR therapy, family behavior therapy, and 12-step facilitation therapy.

As widespread as evidence-based treatments are, many proponents of alternative therapies argue against the so-called “tyranny” of EBTs over the therapeutic landscape. Emerging therapies and treatments that haven’t yet met the criteria to be called evidence-based are often shunned by the American medical and psychotherapy communities, critics say. While few would argue against the need for research in developing medications, critics also say adhering strictly to an evidence-based model discounts the effectiveness of therapies and treatments that may be proven in other ways. Patients looking to receive alternative treatments must pay for them out-of-pocket and must frequently travel to foreign countries.

Examples of psychological and addiction treatments that are not evidence-based include acupuncture, acupressure, reiki, animal-assisted therapy, and certain forms of hypnotherapy.

In making the decision about which types of therapy or addiction treatments to pursue, it’s best to consult with the physicians and therapists at your treatment center. These trained professionals can offer you informed opinions about the potential risks and rewards each type of treatment holds specifically for you.

When you are choosing a private residential treatment program, choose the program that focuses on personalized care, the greatest luxury accommodations, and has the highest accreditations. Harmony Place offers a full continuum of treatment options from detox to transitional living encouraging recovery for a lifetime. For a private consultation and more information, call us today: 1-855-652-9048

Why Breakfast is the Most Important Meal of the Day

Why Breakfast is the Most Important Meal of the DayYour mother always told you, “Sit down and eat your breakfast.” Whether she was invoking generations of folk wisdom or the science of nutrition, Mom was right: Breakfast is the most important meal of the day. In addition to setting the tone for good nutrition throughout the day, eating a healthy breakfast has several benefits.

Maintaining a healthy weight: Breakfast literally means, “breaking the fast.” After a full night of fasting while we sleep, our bodies need a boost when we wake up. And no, coffee alone isn’t enough. Studies show those who routinely skip breakfast are heavier than those who regularly eat a healthy meal in the morning. When we don’t “break the fast” after a full night’s sleep, our bodies to go into “starvation” mode; instead of burning a renewed energy supply, the body begins to burn muscle. When we eat breakfast, we kick-start our metabolism, and therefore, burn foods more efficiently all day long.

Overall better health: Eating breakfast every day reduces our levels of “bad” LDL cholesterol, as well as our risk of developing heart disease and diabetes. Breakfast also gives us our first daily dose of vital nutrients, vitamins, and minerals.

Better mental alertness and concentration: After a healthy breakfast of lean proteins, whole grains, and fresh fruit, our brains are primed to function optimally. While the importance of breakfast is undeniable for kids, it’s no less necessary for adults of every age. Conversely, skipping breakfast, or eating a sugary breakfast, can lead to a quick energy crash, sluggishness, diminished ability to concentrate, and irritability…

…Which brings us to another benefit of breakfast: Improving our mood. Ever felt “hangry” after missing a meal? Becoming overly hungry can lead us to feel angry and irritable. Eating breakfast helps us start the day feeling satisfied, and when we’re satisfied, we’re far less apt to binge later.

Forming healthy habits: One of the overlooked benefits of sitting down to breakfast every day is that we develop a healthy routine. Like making our bed every morning, eating breakfast sets the tone for a productive day.

If you’re someone who tends to rush out the door, or if you’re simply not a morning person, fret not. There are lots of nutritious breakfast options you can prepare in advance. Hard-boiled eggs can be made ahead of time and eaten on the go. Ditto homemade fruit-and-yogurt parfaits, bananas with peanut butter, low-fat granola, or trail mix.

Whichever healthy option you choose, breakfast is yummy. Who can’t use more yum in their life?

Recovery doesn’t just happen. To fully recover in mind, body, and spirit requires professional guidance. You have work to do. At Harmony Place, you never have to do the work alone. We believe in your right of self-determination. We’re meeting where you are and taking you where you want to go. For information on our total continuum of care and luxury residential treatment and a private consultation, call us today: 1-855-652-9048